A Few Unique Homebrew Recipes To Try From BrewToob

I am sorry about the recent lack of posts, I am a very busy man these days with a great, but hectic sales route. Anyway, I will strive to post more often here on out. Here are a few unique homebrew recipes sent to me to post here from my friends at so try these and check their website out for a plethora of great homebrewing information!

Matt Jones is a long time brewer and contributor to Brewtoob.com’s recipe collection. This is one of his favorites.

Green Tea Pale Ale an Extract Recipe

Ingredients

Fermentables:
6 lb LME
1 lb DME
8 oz Carafoam
2 oz Special B

Hops:
1 oz Magnum (60 min)
1 oz Centennial (15 min)
2 oz Goldings

Other additions:
1 oz Green Tea* (15 min)
2 oz Green Tea* (after flameout)
*Quality bulk green teas are better than the bags. I recommend visiting an Asian market or quality foods store if you are able.

Yeast:
Wyeast 1450

I’ve been making wine, mead and beer for over two decades. In that time, my methodology has ranged in complexity from apple juice and baking yeasts to growing and malting my own Maris Otter, but I still enjoy a good extract brew. Too often all grain brewers can look down on extracts. They contend that the process lacks complexity. In my experience, this complexity is lost only in the process of brewing – not in the end result.

The ingredients for extract brewing are only marginally more expensive than all grain (although the equipment required for all grain is considerably more expensive) and the final product tends to be more consistent from batch to batch with extract. Extract brewing is also a huge timesaver. It’s a great way to test out new ideas on a small scale without spending huge amounts of money and time on a larger grain bill for a brew that you might not like. Furthermore, if you’ve only done extract brewing, this is a great recipe to take another (albeit simple) step.

First, you’ll need to steep the specialty grains. These grains are different than base malts (which need to be mashed to release the fermentable sugars). The Carafoam and Special B will contribute to this beer’s body and mouth feel, but won’t significantly contribute to end ABV. Specialty grain malting is an easy way to add complexity and customize an extract brew.
Start by steeping the crushed grains (i.e. add grains to a steeping bag or a pair of panty hoes and put into the water) in ~160 degree water for around 30 minutes. Steeping (unlike mashing) is less scientific. Don’t fret your temps too much – anything between 145 and 165 is close enough for jazz. I steeped the grains in a few gallons of hot water, opting to add more water afterwards to reach my preboil volume. Smaller amounts of water make the temperature easier to control.

After about a half hour, I top off the kettle to just under six gallons. Even with extract I prefer to do full boils. However, if you lack the room in your kettle, you can always use distilled or sterilized water added directly to your fermenter to reach the five-gallon mark. Always use the best water you can find –for this I used mineral spring water that comes from a warm spring a short drive from my house.

Add your extracts and bring the wort to a boil. When it starts to boil, add in your 60 minute hops. Stir constantly and make sure the extract isn’t scorching and the kettle isn’t boiling over. I use a spray bottle with room temperature water to cool down hot foam overs. After 45 minutes, add the 15-minute hop and green tea additions and boil for another fifteen minutes.

When the 60-minute boil is over, cool down your wort. I used an immersion chiller (and used the hot water runoff to do a load of laundry), but feel free to use a sink filled with ice or whatever you can find – always be resourceful! When your wort is still hot (but not boiling) add the other two ounces of green tea. You want to make sure that the green tea isn’t heated to the point where bitter and astringent tannins are released.

When the wort is cooled, add to the sanitized fermenter. I just added the yeast without a starter (as I usually do,) but use a yeast starter if you feel you must. Add your dry hopping additions and ferment for a week at ~65 degrees. I also allowed two weeks for clearing and settling at ~50 degrees (in my basement). I kegged and force carbonated this beer, but obviously you can use corn sugar and bottle, too.

This beer is one of my favorites. Despite the fact that all the ingredients are inexpensive and readily available, the end result is something quite unique. The base beer is essentially pale ale – my favorite beer style. I feel the amount of green tea in this recipe gives a subtle under taste that you are able to find if you’re looking for it. It blends nicely with the floral attributes of the hops, and allows for a somewhat more refreshing finish. Still, some may find this brew somewhat bitter. If you dislike a high IBU pale ale, try adding only .75 ounces of Magnum when the boils starts.

Notwithstanding, feel free add or subtract the amounts of green tea – or even try this technique with other beer styles. The choice is yours and the possibilities are limitless. Happy brewing!

*NOTE: If you simply must brew this all grain, try the following rather than the DME and LME;

10 lbs of pale 2-row
8 oz Carafoam
2 oz Special B Brewtoob is a video sharing site for the homebrewing community. We have hundreds of videos featuring homebrewers sharing their knowledge, techniques, recipes, how to’s, DIY projects and troubleshooting….you name it. All on video so you can see how it’s done.
If you’re a blogger, vlogger, nano-brewery, tutorial creator, etc.. Add more juice to your Google page ranking by creating an account, importing your videos and blog articles and thus adding additional backlinks to your blog or website. And of course, the most important – It’s great to be surrounded by like-minded homebrewers!

Here is another great recipe from Matt Jones, brewer extraordinaire and regular contributor to Brewtoob.

Easy Belgian Tripel Extract Recipe

Belgian beers can be especially intimidating to the new home brewer. They often have frighteningly foreign sounding names and complex tastes. The good news is that much of this taste, however, comes from the yeast. Yes, yeasts are the stars of Belgian style brewing, and (luckily) they’ll do most of the work for you. Belgian yeasts are fantastically complex – typically finishing with fruity and spicy notes.

If you already have a favorite Belgian beer, you may want to try harvesting the yeast from the bottle for your own brews. You’ll be surprised how much of the flavor is attributable to the yeast. For this brew, I used yeast harvested from a bottle of La Fin du Monde.

Furthermore, this recipe is as simple as any other beginner’s recipe with one simple caveat: steeping grains. I would always recommend steeping grains for in extract brewing. They’re a great way for a beginner to get a feel for dealing with less refined ingredients, and a fantastic option for anyone looking to customize an off the shelf kit.

Ingredients:

9.5 lbs Pislner stlye malt extract
.75 lb Belgian candy sugar (I’ve used table sugar with good results, too)
1 lb Carapils
2.5 oz Mt Hood Hops
Belgian Yeast (I recommend Wyeast 1214)
6 gallons of quality water
7.5 oz (for carbonating)

Additional Hardware:
A second fermenter for clearing and conditioning

Although I don’t always make a starter for my yeasts, I do recommend it for this brew. Start at least 24 hours before hand (if you choose to use a starter). There is a lot of work for the yeast to do here, and you want it to hit the ground running. If you detest starters, use two (or three) vials of wet yeast instead.

Put three of the six gallons of water (in a sanitized container) into the refrigerator. Later, you’ll use this water to cool down the wort. Next, take your carapils and put it into a grain bag (pair of panty hoes, silk bag etc). Put the remaining three gallons of water into a five gallon pot, place the grains into the pot and put the heat to it. Make sure that your grains aren’t resting against the bottom of the pot.
When the water reaches about 150 degrees, cut the heat. If you’ve got a lid for the pot, put it on. Allow your grains to steep for about a half hour. After the half hour has passed, remove the grain bag. Allow the bag to drain, but don’t squeeze! This will release more astringent flavors into the wort. Bring the wort to a boil.
Once you’ve reached the boil, add your hops and two pounds of the malt extract. Of course, stir to avoid scorching. Boil for forty-five minutes before adding the remaining 7.5 lbs of malt and the Belgian candy sugar. Stir to integrate and boil for another 15 minutes.
After the 60 minute boil has finished, place the pot into an ice bath until it cools to about 90 degrees. You can hasten the cooling process by adding the cooled water to a fermenter and mixing in the hot wort. This is what I did, but I used a plastic fermenter. I wouldn’t recommend this method for glass carboys – they’ll crack if faced with extreme temperature changes.
At this point, you can take a gravity rating if you wish. I didn’t, but you should expect something between 1.07 and 1.08. This is a strong beer. Add your yeast and ferment at around 70 degrees.
Fermentation times may differ, but use gravity readings to tell when primary fermentation has stopped. Gravity readings measure fermentable sugars, and when you get the same number over several days, no more fermentation will occur without the addition of more fermentables.
When fermentation has stopped, transfer to a secondary fermenter. This adds time to the process, but it clears the look and taste of the beer. Allow the beer to sit in a cool, dark space for another two or more weeks. Bottle using 7.5 ounces of corn sugar, boiled and mixed into the fermenter before bottling. Make sure to use sturdy bottles, as this recipe is highly carbonated.
This is one of my favorite beers to brew. I brew this recipe (or one close to it) often, but my family and friends are always drinking it as quickly as I can brew it. The basic hops/grain elements of the brew are solid, but (again) the yeast is the star. I use this recipe whenever I want to test out a new Belgian yeast. I can compare more readily in light of the fact that these ingredients are widely available and consistent in potency and quality. Feel free to experiment, and happy brewing!

Brewtoob is a video sharing site for the homebrewing community. We have hundreds of videos featuring homebrewers sharing their knowledge, techniques, recipes, how to’s, DIY projects and troubleshooting….you name it. All on video so you can see how it’s done.
If you’re a blogger, vlogger, nano-brewery, tutorial creator, etc.. Add more juice to your Google page ranking by creating an account, importing your videos and blog articles and thus adding additional backlinks to your blog or website. And of course, the most important – It’s great to be surrounded by like-minded homebrewers!

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